Tag: sf

I do love a road trip story.

I do love a road trip story, and what better than an sf road trip story? Nothing, that’s what. Rosemary Harper is podding her way to Wayfarer, a tunnel ship that bores wormhole junctions, there to take up her duties as clerk. Almost as soon as she comes on board Captain Ashby Santoso bids on…

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“…a nonlinear computer weighing only 160 pounds, having a billion binary decision elements, that can be mass produced by unskilled labor.”

— 1 — Nonlinear Computers …a nonlinear computer weighing only 160 pounds, having a billion binary decision elements, that can be mass produced by unskilled labor. —Scott Crossfield’s description of an astronaut THE CAPTAIN SPAT OUT A HANK OF MY HAIR and swore. “Star, either you tie up that mess or I take a knife…

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The Better Part of Valor (Confederation, #2)The Better Part of Valor by Tanya Huff

Even better than the first in the series (Valor's Choice). Torin Kerr and her three-species space-going marines lead a team of civilian scientists and a pain-in-the-ass reporter into an enormous alien vessel they call Big Yellow. Their only handicaps are a glory-hound commanding officer the brass want to shine so as to placate his species' representatives in the galactic Parliament, and, uh, oh yes, the enemy ship that unexpectedly shows up, loaded and ready for bear. Turns out they've got people on board Big Yellow, too. It's like a haunted house story, only, you know, on a big, sentient banana with transmogriphic powers, with nothing but the cheery presence of absolute zero and fighters exchanging missile fire on the other side of the hatch.

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Impulse (Jumper, #3)Impulse by Steven Gould

Third in the saga of teleport David, his wife Milly, and now their daughter Cent. Steven Gould is the direct descendant of Robert A. Heinlein and Joe Haldeman--he writes so sensibly and practically of impossible things that he makes you believe, well, the impossible. He's really given serious, extended thought in these novels (Jumper, Reflex) to just what it would be like to be able to teleport, and to just how attractive that would make you to the powers that be. If you live in daily fear of being kidnapped by forces determined to exploit your ability, what do you do with your life? How do you stay out of their reach? Do you decide to try to do good in the world anyway, at the risk of losing your freedom and self-determination? How do you raise a child in this world to be aware and responsible? (FYI, Milly and David do a pretty good job.)

I read Impulse in one sitting. Watching Cent, a very atypical rebellious teenager, learning to cope with her world's privileges and its dangers and even to extend its boundaries is riveting stuff. Cent is a marvelous addition to this world and is now my favorite character in it. I hope we get to go there again.

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