Category: Kate Shugak

It took Mutt precisely seventeen seconds, trotting back and forth with her nose to the ground, to pick up Johnny’s scent from the T-shirt Kate held out to her to where the boy smell from it led into the bushes.

From A Grave Denied, the thirteenth Kate Shugak novel: It took Mutt precisely seventeen seconds, trotting back and forth with her nose to the ground, to pick up Johnny’s scent from the T-shirt Kate held out to her to where the boy smell from it led into the bushes.  It took them forty-six minutes, Kate…

Read more It took Mutt precisely seventeen seconds, trotting back and forth with her nose to the ground, to pick up Johnny’s scent from the T-shirt Kate held out to her to where the boy smell from it led into the bushes.

She walked out on stage wrapped in fifty yards of sheer white chiffon, a pair of high-heeled shoes with jeweled buckles, and nothing else.

From The Singing of the Dead, the eleventh Kate Shugak novel: Dawson City December 24, 1897 She walked out on stage wrapped in fifty yards of sheer white chiffon, a pair of high-heeled shoes with jeweled buckles, and nothing else. There was a second of stunned silence in the packed, smoky saloon, before deafening and…

Read more She walked out on stage wrapped in fifty yards of sheer white chiffon, a pair of high-heeled shoes with jeweled buckles, and nothing else.

Let her get on the next plane out of here.  Let her get off in Anchorage, or, better yet, Seattle, or best of all, Etadunna, Australia.

From Midnight Come Again, the tenth Kate Shugak novel: Jim distinctly remembered “forklift operator” printed in the job title slot of the form he had filled out in Anchorage, and he did operate the battered old propane-powered forklift from time to time.  When he could be spared from loading and unloading the Piper Super Cub,…

Read more Let her get on the next plane out of here.  Let her get off in Anchorage, or, better yet, Seattle, or best of all, Etadunna, Australia.

He believed that secret operatives working on behalf of the U.N. had put directions in invisible ink on the backs of all government highway signs, readable only by U.N. troops wearing special government-issue goggles.

Excerpt from Hunter’s Moon, the ninth Kate Shugak novel: The nearest neighbor to the gold mine was a man named Crazy Emmett who lived in a cabin on a tiny lake five miles away. Crazy Emmett, an ex-history teacher from West High School in Anchorage, had retired at his earliest possible date of eligibility and…

Read more He believed that secret operatives working on behalf of the U.N. had put directions in invisible ink on the backs of all government highway signs, readable only by U.N. troops wearing special government-issue goggles.