Category: Book Review Monday

One of the recurring themes that Collins delights in is the instruction women received from the media on their behavior and place in society.

Gail Collins’ America’s Women (400 Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates, and Heroines) reads like the women studies class I was never offered at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It should be required reading for every US high school student today. Listen to some of this stuff: The most famous runaway slave…was [Harriet Tubman:]…In 1849, when…

Read more One of the recurring themes that Collins delights in is the instruction women received from the media on their behavior and place in society.

…including all the times Davy blows up at Michael Faraday, not to mention all the times he blows up his lab.

  “Romantic science can be dated roughly, and certainly symbolically, between two celebrated voyages of exploration…” As in Captain Cook’s first expedition, begun in 1768, and Charles Darwin’s voyage begun in 1831. “This is the time I have called the Age of Wonder,” Richard Holmes writes in his book of the same name, “and with…

Read more …including all the times Davy blows up at Michael Faraday, not to mention all the times he blows up his lab.

No matter how minute the detail (three leaky tubes of adhesive) it always goes somewhere (the disabling of an enemy ship and the complete rout of an entire barbarian horde).

Read more of my Goodreads reviews here. The 22nd Kate Shugak novel, coming January 9, 2020. Click here to pre-order a signed copy of the hardcover edition.

Read more No matter how minute the detail (three leaky tubes of adhesive) it always goes somewhere (the disabling of an enemy ship and the complete rout of an entire barbarian horde).