Aside

“She had figured out how to set bail, and how high.”

The Collected Short StoriesIn the six months since she had been sworn in she had stumbled through her first arrest warrants, fumbled through her first search warrants, and muddled through her first arraignments. She had figured out how to set bail, and how high. She had issued half a dozen restraining orders, and had taken emergency action in one case of child abuse that still gave her nightmares. She had tried, convicted and sentenced no less than sixteen drunk drivers. She had tried and convicted one fisher of fishing without a permit, a second for fishing past the end of the period, a third for harvesting female opilio, a fourth for harvesting undersized kings, and a fifth for fishing outside the district to which his permit restricted him. She had learned to discount most excuses offered by fishers, because if all the engines alleged to have broken down in her courtroom really had, half the Bering Sea fishing fleet would be in dry dock.

—”Missing, Presumed…”

Only in e.

On Amazon.comAmazon.ukAmazon.auiTunesBarnes & Noble and Kobo.

Aside

“Even then, if you did get lucky, three months later your luck went south again.”

The Collected Short StoriesWhen the phone rang he’d been curled up on his warm, wide couch, submitting happily to an enthusiastic and comprehensive ravishment by Alice Sampson, a pert young barista of nineteen, to whom Larry had given some thought to proposing. In this small town on stilts twenty-five miles north of the Arctic Circle the ratio of men to women was such that if you missed your turn you lost your place in line and were out of luck until summer when the park ranger interns showed up. Even then, if you did get lucky, three months later your luck went south again.

—“On the Evidence”

 

Only in e.

On Amazon.comAmazon.ukAmazon.auiTunesBarnes & Noble and Kobo.

More Liam Than You Can Handle

For the first time, all four Liam Campbell e-novels and all two Liam Campbell e-short stories under one cover:

My e-publisher, Gere Donovan Press, writes

Newenham, Alaska is a Bush town with a six-bed jail, a busted ATM and a saloon that does double-duty as a courtroom. It’s a wide-enough patch to warrant a state police presence, though, and Trooper Liam Campbell is it, posted there to spend some much-needed time in the wilderness. Campbell didn’t expect the new job to be simple, but finding his ex-lover crouched over a headless body is a hell of a way to get off the plane.

Couldn’t have put it better myself, and all this Liam goodness available for the bargain basement price of $9.99! I took a quick venture into higher math, and after I corrected my backwards caculations for the correct frontwards ones, that comes out to

0.00002813 cents per word!

Such a deal.

Download here:

On Amazon, for your Kindle.
On Barnes & Noble, for your Nook.
On iTunes, for your iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch


You should be following Gere Donovan Press on Twitter, too, mostly so you can read tweets like this one

which made me laugh out loud and which sparked a whole bunch of comments when I posted it to my Facebook page.

There is also this message

What they said. (Please do not feel so moved if you hate all my books like poison.)

Boots on the Ground Research

[Luncheon speech for the Poisoned Pen Conference, July 13, 2012]

Sometimes research is easy.

When I lived in Anchorage my house was right under the traffic pattern to the seaplane base of Lake Hood. One day my father was helping me with something in my back yard and a Cessna 206 was taking off with its engine at full and it was really loud. My father, a bush pilot, scowled up at it and said, “There is the sound of someone not flying their own plane.”

I pointed at him and said, “You just wrote the first line of my next book.”

Dad was always my first resource for all things Alaskan, planes, guns, who really killed who back in the day, where they were probably buried. All I had to do was pick up the phone.

Sometimes research is not that easy, but it sure is cheap. Two ridealongs with the US Coast Guard, one sixteen days in February 2004 in the Bering Sea, and the second seven weeks in the eastern Pacific Ocean in 2007, and all it cost me was airfare to the debarkation ports and my food while I was on board. I got to go on a courtesy call on another cutter in the Bering Sea, I got to jump off the side of the ship in 8,000 meters of water, I got to fly a helo off the hangar deck, and I got two <a target="_blank" href="http://www.amazon.com/ novels out of it, one of which hit the New York Times bestseller list. Cheap at a thousand times the price.

Sometimes, research is serendipity. In 1999 Alaska magazine approached me to ask in diffident tones that invited a response in the negative if I’d like to travel around Alaska and write about it. On their dime. For five years I did, which produced fifty monthly columns about places in Alaska many of which I never would have been able to afford to go to on my own, and many of those places wound up in the Kate Shugak and Liam Campbell novels.

For example, I went to Bethel in western Alaska to write a column about C’Mai Fest, an annual Alaska Native dance festival that features dance groups from all over Alaska, from Canada and from Outside. Sometimes groups come from Hawaii, and New Zealand. So, Kate dances with the aurora at the end of A Fatal Thaw, and Bering, my name for Bethel, is where she runs after the traumatic events of Hunter’s Moon, and is where Chopper Jim finds her again in Midnight Come Again and from where brings her home.

I went to Kotzebue to see the Kobuk Valley National Park and the yellow sand dunes that look like Lawrence of Arabia is going to come galloping over them on a camel, and all this above the Arctic Circle. And Kotzebue became the setting of a Liam Campbell short story, “On the Evidence.”

On the Evidence

Sometimes? Research is difficult and expensive as hell. I spent this April in Europe, studying anything and everything that pertained of the years 1320 to 1327 in Venice, Paris, Chartres, Troyes, London and Nottingham. Previously, I spent three weeks in 2005 in China traveling the Silk Road, two weeks in Turkey in 2011 seeing everything classical and medieval on offer, and in 1987 I went to Les Baux, all this in support of an historical novel about Marco Polo’s granddaughter traveling the Silk Road west, from China to England from, you guessed it, the years 1323-1330.

How did this happen? I read The Adventures of Marco Polo and never recovered. I love maps, and the first thing I did was try to trace his travels on a map, and then I spent a lot of time and money trying to get to as many places on those maps as I could afford.

Because I tend to read in subjects, after I read Marco Polo I then read a bunch of other books about that time, and discovered trouveres, and pilgrims, and Venetian merchants, and every European nation’s whipping boy, the Jews, and the Knights Templar, and mapmakers, and aristocratic French lady pirates, and chuggis. There’s at least one of each in my novel.

You’ve all heard that old saw, the writer’s dictum, “Write what you know.” Okay, true so far as it goes. Two caveats, however.

First, I’ve written books set in near-earth orbit, the asteroid belt, and on Mars. I know it will come as a great shock to you all to learn that I haven’t been to any of these places. I didn’t have to not breathe the air of Mars to write convincingly about its surface in Red Planet Run because NASA very kindly got there before I started writing and sent back lots of great pictures and maps for me to look at.

cover by Adam Murdoch

The point is I did look at them. I had to do my due diligence in availing myself of all extant research, and so does every writer, no matter what her subject and no matter how extensive and exhaustive that research is. “What you know” is what you see for yourself and what you can look up in books and on credible online sources. Sloppy research is productive only of an unconvincing narrative, and you better believe readers notice that kind of thing.

Second. Research is a very seductive occupation. You can spend the rest of your life looking stuff up. I can open a dictionary to look up Gog and Magog, and half an hour later be reading the definition of narthex, with stops at provost, barkentine and tricostate on the way. Research is a siren song, and comes a time to stop up your ears with wax and trim your sails between the Scylla of cinquefoil and the Charybdis of Cinque Ports, and come safely home to harbor, where your keyboard awaits.

At this point, my personal reference library for my historical novel, collected from new and used bookstores, street sales, boot sales, flea markets, museum stores, and online sources over a period of sixteen years, now includes at a conservative estimate

*116 books, like for example, Sharan Newman’s The Real History Behind the Templars, anything ever written by Frances and Joseph Gies, not one, as I recently discovered, but two copies of Madeleine Pelner Cosman’s The Medieval Wordbook (oops) and a 1937 edition of The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan by James Morier, found in an estate sale in Ireland, which includes fabulous color illustrations of zaftig harem girls with captions like “Your eyes have made roast meat of my heart.”

Also in my reference library are

*Professor Bonnie Wheeler’s Great Courses audio recording of ‘Medieval Heroines in History and Legend’ on CD

*a dozen travel documentaries on DVD, from the Silk Road to a tour of Jerusalem to a history of Venice

*countless historical novels

*some children’s coloring books (‘Je colorie les Chateaux Forts’ being my favorite)

*a bunch of recommendations for reference works from Sharon Kay Penman

*and my very own personal on demand reference librarian.

It is indeed now time to stop researching and start writing Silk and Song. I’ve read, I’ve studied, I’ve traveled to as many places as I have had time for and as I could afford.

I’ve done my due diligence. Time to write.

2012 Poisoned Pen Conference in Phoenix

The third annual Poisoned Pen Con, aka Books at the Biltmore:

Friday, July 13th, at the Biltmore Hotel in Phoenix, Arizona (If you want to stay at the hotel Barbara got us a killer rate.)
9:30 AM-4:30 PM
$20 Registration, Cash Buffet lunch
Featuring authors Howard L Anderson, Mark De Castrique, Timothy Hallinan, Alex Kava, Jesse Kellerman, Martin Limon, Francine Mathews (also known as Stephanie Barron), and moi.

I’m interfering with your digestion by giving the luncheon speech. I’ll be talking about boots on the ground research. I’ve done two ridealongs with the US Coast Guard for two Coastie novels, I wrote a column for Alaska magazine for five years where I got lots of ideas for the Kate and Liam novels, and — so far — I’ve been to France, China, Turkey, Italy, and England for research for an historical novel called Silk and Song. I’ll tell you all about it.

I’ve attended this conference for the last two years. It’s small and intimate and you get quality programming and a lot of up close and personal with the authors. I really like it. And I love the Biltmore pool.

See you this Friday!

Last day to win a Restless in the Grave audiobook!

Today, the last day of our giveaway, we’re giving away NINE copies of the audio of Restless in the Grave!

Do like this:

In the comments below, tell me why you want one. Simple as that.

Comment submissions end tonight at midnight Alaska time.

I will choose my nine favorite comments tomorrow, and the nine people who wrote them will win an audio copy, sent to them personally (and if I know her, immediately) by Samantha the Sensational down at Macmillan Audio.

Write hard!


YouTube audio of the interview narrator Marguerite Gavin and I did.

Restless in the Grave narrator Marguerite Gavin

Five more audiobook winners today!

Man, you guys are not remotely interested in making my life any easier, are you? Thanks again for all the smart, funny, heartbreaking comments. This week’s winners below.

[The other] Dana of Springfield, Missouri, wrote, “Good morning world! Today begins my state conference of adult, community and continuing ed professionals – all who share a love of learning and teaching. One of the many things I always get while here is a new list of recommended reading/listening (we all travel quite a lot to get to rural parts of the state and region) – I had dinner last night with six people, five of whom had read all of Dana’s books – ALL of them! I have a feeeling I might see some competition today here, because I told them about the giveaway…ha!! We made a pact that if someone in our group wins wins, s/he would pass the set on to each other – and at the end of the experience, we’ll donate it to a library in the winner’s region. Well, this is what we do and love – pass on the love of reading and learning!”

This Dana says, “Five winners at once, and then a library donation. Irresistible.”

Betty of Bellevue, Nebraska, wrote, “I work at a library and love listening to and recommending audiobooks. I would listen to “Restless in the Grave” myself and then donate it to the library so that other patrons who enjoy your books could experience it, too. We have a blind patron, Elaine, who reads many of the same authors I do and I’m always looking for new books to recommend to her. Not long ago, I purchased “A Night Too Dark” and donated it to the library. So far it is the only Kate Shugak audiobook we have. I do ask the senior librarian to buy my favorites sometimes but I can only do that so often before she chases me out of her office, yelling about funds…”

Dana says, “Two winners plus a library donation in one. Also irresistible.”

Eva of Kamuela, Hawaii, wrote, “My request is on behalf of Thelma Parker Memorial Public School Library on the Big Island of Hawai’i, where I work. We have many of the Kate Shugak series on paper; there are none in our collection in compact disc format. As a matter of fact, there are no compact discs of the series statewide, although two of the books are available as phonotapes and two as electronic resources…Thank you for considering this request. If we do luck out and get a copy, I intend (selfishly) to be the first person to check it out. There would be many more after me since it would be the only CD of the series in the state, and available to every Kate fan (or potential Kate fan) therein.”

Dana says, “My week for libraries, evidently.”

Kris, temporarily of Livermore, Colorado, wrote, “We’ve become part of the legion of evacuees from the huge High Park fire here in Colorado. Audiobooks have become “story telling time” occasionally, for small puddles of folks who have gone from Kate-with-the-bear-after-her speed, to full stop as our lives are on hold until the brilliant crews make it safe to go home again.”

Dana says, “I wish I could send you a hundred.”

Linda of Bridgewater, Virginia, wrote, “I simply cannot think of two people I’d rather have in my car than Kate and Liam… well, okay, the others can come, too, but they may have to ride in the trunk.”

Dana says, “Made me laugh.”

Again, folks, I can’t tell you how hard it has been to choose winners each week. Wayne, BJ, the rest of you who are on your second or third try, remember

next Tuesday I’m giving away 9 (NINE!) (IX!) Restless in the Grave audiobooks, so please do try just one more time.